How to get Shiny on the server and JavaScript in the browser talking to each other

On our server we’re programming in R with a variety of add-on packages, primarily Shiny. Users, on the other hand, are all viewing our site using browsers, which run the programming language JavaScript. This article is about how to use a Shiny command to send a message to the user’s browser, telling it to run a JavaScript function. I’ll also include how to get that JavaScript function to send a message back to Shiny (it will appear as a reactive in the input$ list).

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Installing and configuring a database engine like MySQL or MariaDB on Amazon Lightsail

So many choices! In previous blogs I’ve talked about the traditional LAMP stack, in which the “M” stands for the open-source MySQL database engine. I barely understand the details, but somehow Oracle now owns MySQL. There’s still a free open-source version, often referred to as the community edition. Some open-source developers weren’t happy about the Oracle switch, however, and “forked” the MySQL code into a new project called MariaDB.

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How to connect to Amazon Lightsail with PuTTY, FileZilla, WinSCP, and HeidiSQL

Connections from your own computer to your instance on Amazon Lightsail are made using SSH keys rather than passwords. Here are some tips for setting up connections between some useful Windows programs and your instance.

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How to send email from R with the help of Amazon SES and mailR

Now we have a LEMRS stack. How about adding email? Amazon’s Simple Email Service seems anything but simple when you confront its voluminous documentation, so here’s a tl;dr version for a relatively simple set-up with R. One of the big attractions here is that if you’re already running an Amazon instance, you can send thousands of emails every month at no additional cost. Otherwise, it’s 10 cents per thousand emails. You may find it worthwhile to sign up for Amazon Web Services just for the ability to send email.

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How to configure nginx and shiny-server for a LEMRS stack

My last post included an Amazon Lightsail launch script to set up an instance with a LEMRS (Linux / EngineX (nginx) / MySQL / R / Shiny-Server) stack. This time we’re going transfer files into the instance, including new configuration files for nginx and shiny-server, start both of them up, and see how they work.

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Launch script for a LEMRS stack on Amazon Lightsail

In my last post I talked about the strategy I used to figure out what should go into a LEMRS launch script. A major theme of this post is that I now know more about Linux than I ever have before and ever will again, so I’m trying to document what I’ve done and otherwise take care of future me when I have to get back in and update all this stuff. [NOTE: There is now an updated version of this script.]

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How to write a script for setting up a LEMRS stack on Amazon Lightsail

In my last post, I bumped into Amazon Lightsail and discovered the joys of virtual servers. In this post I’m going to talk about how a Linux noob like me figured out what to put in Lightsail’s Create Instance launch script to build a LEMRS stack. In my next post, I’ll show you the actual Lightsail script I’m using.

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How about Amazon Lightsail for hosting LEMRS stacks?

In the world of web servers, a stack describes the critical software used on the server. The most well-known stack is LAMP – Linux (operating system), Apache (web server), MySQL (database), and PHP (programming language). For example, WordPress and other content-management systems typically rely on a LAMP stack.

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